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I have a question from your joe McCarthy memorial post. You say your dampfhammer motor makes 200 lbft of torque at 5250rpm that equates to 200fwhp at 5250rpm. That seems a big claim from an 86x86 engine. Is that correct? Or am i missing something.
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #882 ·
I have a question from your joe McCarthy memorial post. You say your dampfhammer motor makes 200 lbft of torque at 5250rpm that equates to 200fwhp at 5250rpm. That seems a big claim from an 86x86 engine. Is that correct? Or am i missing something.
You remember this correctly, the cross point is exactly at 5255 rpm where torque = power. We measured 245 [email protected] rpm at the wheels, which corresponds to 181 ftlb at the wheels. I wouldn't know it if the VE there weren't that high there. I had to dial in 130 % of VE to match the aim lambda at WOT at this engine speed. I gave the driver a signal to tell me the actual torque at the rollers, as I had to expect around 110 % VE at this point according to my simulation. I was so impressed what was happening there.

The Engine was crazy knocking at 40° VTC, I heard it clearly even under the Micky Mouse (ear plugs). I've retarded ignition timing by 12° and it still knocked like hell. I remembered my setup simulation told me that at the left side of high speed cam there will be a chance of exhaust gas communication of cylinders, creating eventually a higher residual exhaust gas content, so I shortened the scavenging phase by retarding VTC and it was a world of difference. No single knock, but amazing high VE. The engine was at 20° VTC, WOT, 5250 rpm and pulled down 181 wftlb'[email protected] % VE. That's a VE level I never saw before myself on NA engine, I just heard of it.

When you do an assumption based calculation of flywheel power with an drivetrain efficiency of 88 %, which would be high for a Y2M3 JDM 6spd transmission, than you will get 205 ftlb's at flywheel. That is the lowest. If you use a 85 % efficiency, which would be more common to Honda's K-series 6-speeders in 4th gear, then it would even higher. I know this is a number which is very rare in the K-series scene. But let me tell you, those 102.5 ftlb/liter at flywheel are exceeded by the top dogs of Drag Scene in the NA I4 class. They have an advantage of the 106-108 mm stroke, which is a crazy VE enhancer. The DAMPFHAMMER has only 86 mm. Anyway, I've integrated two bigger innovations to increase VE in the DAMPFHAMMER technology. I competed with this project to setup a new world record regarding the widest and highest torque: from 4500 to 8500 rpm more then 191 ftlb at flywheel. If this would be achieved, the goal would be achieved. As the tranny stuck because of lacking oil, I couldn't tune it further. Therefore my friend an me building the engine dyno room to get this engine tune finished.

BTW, for those who don't know what VE means. VE is the volumetric efficiency. This number gives you the ratio of how much air mass is actually in the cylinder over what would be in the cylinder when you would have an imaginary cylinder and let just atmospheric pressure fill it the hole day long. A VE of 100 % means the inducted air mass corresponds exactly the volume of your cylinder at atmospheric conditions. A VE of 130 % VE means you have 30 % mass added to that. So this induction technology I've developed works like a natural supercharger at around 7 psi. I know those numbers sound untypically high, but my calibrated VE model and the torque of the dyno told the same story.

The best thing may still come, maximum VE is reached at 7500 rpm, a point the car wasn't there yet. According my simulation we will see 310 [email protected] rpm, but I know my simulation had a better performing combustion than the actual engine. Calculated torque at 5250 rpm was 198 ftlb's at flywheel, which is 7 ftlb's less. That would be ok. What is not ok, VE should be around 110 % and not at 130 %. So I have more air in the cylinder than simulated, but not too much more torque. That means the combustion process calculation was a bit too overrated in my simulation compared to the real combustion. To get exact information of that I bought a TFX 4-cylinder cylinder pressure indication system to see the exact cylinder pressure over crank angle. With all that information I can adjust my model and learn where I can find more ponies 😊. Many plans are on the road to go to investigate to increase power. I have the feeling the basis is not bad.
 

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That's a very impressive VE. I would be interested to know where you're finding these improvements. Port design, cams, manifold design, piston design, valve seat design? I suppose a combination of all those things working in harmony is the key.
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #886 ·
I suppose a combination of all those things working in harmony is the key.
Yesssss, think of...


Harmonization is the key. Perfection of that like the Berliner Philharmoniker is an endless improvement. But getting a feeling of what it could mean is amazing. For me the DAMPFHAMMER is a sort of that feeling.

intake and exhaust manifold design
Yessssss

Stock head and cams? Which head, If you dont mind me asking. I realise you want to hold onto your trade secrets.
Almost stock head, definitely different valve timings.

Flow bench:
Yesterday we flow a stock VAG EA113 head. A friend of us made a 3D print for the inlet to get consistent flow comparisons of all heads. It is just a 7 mm radius to get a bigger Vena Contracta, which measures around the same as the real port. We flow the head 3 times from 0 mm to 12 mm valve lift, where the port began to be saturated at almost 9 mm valve lift.

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As you can see the series head has inside bores in the intake to place the brackets for the tumble flap. In the first measurement we run with them in series condition, 2nd run I calmed the flow flux value by an bigger average range. This wasn't efficient. But as we closed the flap bracket bores we calmed the flow greatly. It was amazing to see how much turbulence is created there, not effecting flow too much in average of around a minute, but if you look just a part of a second on it the difference can be about 10 % in flow. Next time I will show more data if there is an interest.

We also molded the RSP port, a BMW bicycle head chamber and a PPA head chamber. Next time I will do a comparison analysis of PPA vs RSP port.

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The RSP port is much different to the PPA. My first impression was the PPA is the fat brother of the trained and defined RSP. A smarter design. I am curious how it looks like when I analysis the cross section over port length curve.
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #887 ·
Flowbench:
As mentioned above, below the flow comparison of the EA113 intake port with Supertech valves instead of series valves. Comparison data is from ARP, a well known parts supplier of the VAG scene and our data (RS-Motorsport, but the good one 😂).

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The Supertech valves have a huge seat width, which one can see in the comparison. At lower valve lift they support the flow more then at full lift, where the width began to decrease the flow. We improved the sealing of the flow bench, we are now at 60" water column at 3 cfm at fully closed, but not matched new valves and old seats. That is a great achievement. We can improve the sealing by pressing the head down by only 1 cfm, that means, gravity seals already enough and our bracket for the head is perfect machined 🆙.

Next time, RSP, PPA, RBB measurement data. I am sooooo excited to measure them 😍.
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #888 ·
Engine dyno:
We are still working on the engine dyno cooling. A sea container is used for the components, moved from workshop to the container to release space in the workshop for the piping of the exhaust gases and cooling piping. Last week we got the coolant to air cooler, which cam from a CHP (combined heat and power) plant, has about 1 MW cooling power.

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That baby will be moved on top of the sea container. Buddy bought also a crank balance machine from Schenk. Now we have already 3 Schenk machines for tune and performance measurement.

104411
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #889 ·
Drag engine progress:

Here are our modified ports for the 1200 hp drag engine. Welded and closed bore holes for the swirl flap bracket and CNC cutted port.

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Here in action on the bench with our DIY valve adjustment kit on the DIY flow bench.

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Cutting a new seat with the MIRA valve seat cutter. Works amazing.

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Unfortunately the CNC port didn't cut much on the bowl, exactly it cut nothing there. Our valve seat cut tool was designed for a cut depth of > 0.5 mm. We lost the throat, so the port efficiency felt down hugely. Next time, no hurry, first port, than valve seat cut design. That's the row we follow now. I am going to design a new seat cut tool for a spec'd throat. That means we will loose some power on that way. If the wall is not cut accordingly my first tool, the valve throat ration can't be on design spec. It will be smaller, so the Mach 1 zone will get a smaller cross section, which equals to a lower mass. This will cost roughly 100 ponies. Anyway, the good thing is, now we will mount cooper beryllium seats.
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #891 ·
Is the 1200 hp project Audi based ?
It's a EA113 engine basis, which will get operated in a heavily modified Golf MK2 chassis with an AUDI Quattro Drivetrain (4WD).

Very cool to be able to do the machine work in house.
Yes, it is. Most of what we do is done inhouse. We do a lot of DIY tools, but also we bought some very old but still perfect tools to fine tune our engines, like the crankshaft weight balance machine (s. some posts above).
 

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Arouse the DAMPFHAMMER!
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Discussion Starter · #892 ·
Flow bench of the EA113 head
We had only little time last week, but I did some on the intake port characterizing :D.

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Far different to the K-series ports. Major difference is the lower bending of just 30° instead of around 51° from inlet to outlet rated at the symmetric axis. Beside that the port is much shorter, just 73 mm long. Valve size is 34 mm, but the throat is much much lower then the K-series.

I did some old school investigations, sort of CT-tomographics 😉.

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Cutting it into pieces of interest.

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Count it into cross sectional areas. If you find a failure, I would be happy to correct it. It was Sunday evening and I was already too tired to validate my counts a 2nd time. The approach is full cells plus radial placed counts of partly filled 25'ers.

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Put into a form which tells you more about the design. Here the design is totally different compared to the K-series head. They thought the post divider section creates a much bigger boundary layer, therefore the increase in cross section to keep the velocity steadily increasing according the cross section nozzle approach to accelerate it. The accelerate it less then the K-series, much less! Despite that, the port we have now is looks better to me then that of ARP (US head specialist for VAG engines). Now I am going to redesign the valve seat to improve the flow above 10 mm lift without loosing much of flow capacity down low. Nice one shoot-one hit-challenge.
 
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