Honda / Acura K20a K24a Engine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Tech Article

The things the majority like to call rice.

Why are there spoilers on FWD cars? (To fight the lift at the rear)
Why are they so high?


Ever wonder why people put such high wings on their cars? No, it’s not to make their cars to look like shopping carts. Race cars utilize high pedestal for their wings because they are positioning their wing in an area where “clean air” is located.

Clean air is basically the area of air that is flowing smoothly around a moving car. When a car goes forward, it is displacing air around itself. In the front of the car, high pressure builds up because more air molecules are being compressed from the cars front bumper and the forward motion of the car. Conversely, the rear portion of the car has low pressure because the car has displaced air molecules from the forward motion of the car. This causes a vacuum effect in the rear portion of the car. No clean air is flowing to this vacuum.



A wing can only produce downforce if it is being affected by a clean air flow. If a wing is located in the rear vacuum of a car, it has no chance of utilizing the clean air flow to produce downforce. So which wing height is best for your car? Below is a breakdown of different car styles that can help you choose which height is best for you.


The Ferrari 360GTC uses a carbon fiber mid-range wing to increase downforce in the rear.

Coupes and Fastbacks/Liftbacks
The rear window on coupes and fastbacks/liftbacks usually taper down at a slight angle. This design is used to reduce drag and the described rear vacuum effect. High to mid-range wings will really work well to produce downforce for these types of cars.


BTCC Touring car, MG Z6 entering a turn. Note the height of the wing, which achieves clean air contact.

Sedans
Because sedans have a steep rear window angle, the vacuum effect in the rear is much greater then coupes/fastbacks. This means that lower height wings are not positioned in an area of clean air. The best way prevent this is to put a wing higher up from the rear deck of a car into an area of clean air. High to mid-range wings will work the best for sedans to produce downforce.



BTCC Civic Type R positions a carbon fiber wing right over the roof line to achieve contact with clean air.

Hatchbacks and Wagons
Hatchbacks and wagons have a problem… there are no rear decks to mount a wing. Fortunately these types of cars have a unique shape. Clean air flow goes over the top roof on hatchbacks and wagons. So by using a roof wing, hatchbacks can already position a wing in a clean air flow location.

But if you don't want a wing, what can I say (shrugs shoulders) YOUR LOSS.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
909rex said:
well you go ahead abd put a big wing on your car.... so then i can point and laught... cause that wing aint gonna do shit when im SOHC passes you... :twisted: :evil: :twisted:
Rex chill out. Function over form. Thats your opinion. Facts are all over the Tutorial now don't ruin the thread.

Your SOHC anit touching the K24.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
909rex said:
well by all means go ahead and put a nice ass 747 wing made by boeing and get your downforce cause i know your always going at the speed where you need it...
You need to stop..... If you don't like it don't reply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
In all actually, you will need a wing if you plan to track your car and achieve high speeds for long durations of time. As for a wing that is not wind tunnel tested( which is about 99% of all wings on the market), all you are creating is actually drag, which then in turn slows you down. All those wings you showed in your example are perfect examples of wings that are matched to the vehicle over extensive research and development and wind tunnel testing and are made by aerodynamicists.

The only wing that will ever make a difference on one of my cars is the Mugen wing paired with the Mugen Hardtop for my S2000, both wind tunnel tested and race tested.... looks like I better buy some stock in APC for all those ricers with wings, I can make a killing!!! :twisted:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
C-Zero said:
I would not say 99 %.
Well, name another company that produces these "spoilers" and has proof that they have been wind tunnel tested? or even race tested?

I can name 1= Mugen...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Blue-Civic-Hybrid said:
C-Zero said:
I would not say 99 %.
Well, name another company that produces these "spoilers" and has proof that they have been wind tunnel tested? or even race tested?

I can name 1= Mugen...
Does not matter BCH, the real spoilers will be over $300 and they will already be Wind tunnel tested like C-wings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Well, someday I'll get that Mugen wing and hardtop...but alas So Cal house payments are so high!!!

Just for the record, I do like spoilers but only if they fit the flow of the vehicle...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Wings on FWD race cars are tricky things. A lot of the wings out on the market are cosmetic and not necessarily good for anything other than a look. The wing creates downforce but along with that it makes drag too. It is usually more of an impediment to speed than an aid to handling

When you see a wing on a FWD race car like a BTCC Civic it is always used in conjunction with a front splitter. The wing balances the downforce of the front splitter. The wings on FWD touring cars are limited in size by BTCC regulation, but even if they weren't they wouldn't be very big.

Ideally if you are doing circuit events, you would look for an effective splitter design and then choose a wing to balance the car, keeping in mind that your engine's horsepower determines how much splitter and wing you can afford to drag around.

brian g
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
besides the mugen stuff, the only other wing that i know has an effect is the fd3s rx7 rear wing IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE FRONT LIP! AS STATED ABOVE.:up:
i personally know someone with an FD and he said it starts getting extremely unstable after about 160 w/o wing and front lip...of course that does not apply to every car on the road but you gotta think within reason...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
signalpuke said:
Little wings on the edges of the front bumper.
I think a more proficient way to create downforce would be a diffuser in the rear under the bumper
No, those are canards. The splitter is a flat panel that extends from side to side at the bottom of the front bumper or air dam. The term splitter comes from it function of splitting the air going around the front of the car from that going under the car.

If the air passing under the car is relatively non-turbulent, a diffuser is a superior way of creating downforce on the rear of the car.

brian g
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top