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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


The welds on the tack welded nut inside the frame of the car came loose on bolt #20 in the diagram. Instead of cutting it or coming up with a clever solution we just kept yanking on the subframe until the backing nut ripped through the bottom of the frame. There is a good sized hole but I didn't take any pictures of it.

My question is, would I be fine to not use bolt #20 and just have #18 and #19 hold on the front compliance bushing or would that be unsafe or make the car handle horribly? The broken side is a smaller bolt and I still have the larger one to attach the bushing to the car.

If that won't work, how am I supposed to weld another nut in there to fix it correctly? Am I going to have to cut the frame open to get access or is there another method to go about it?

What do you think?
 

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hard to tell without pictures. personally i wouldnt run it with just 2 bolts. they made it 3 bolts for a reason, without the 3rd one there is more stress and uneven load on the other 2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hard to tell without pictures. personally i wouldnt run it with just 2 bolts. they made it 3 bolts for a reason, without the 3rd one there is more stress and uneven load on the other 2.
I can have some pictures up by Sunday morning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd run with only 2 bolts, but then again, I don't always made the smartest decisions :D
Ha, same here.

Sorry, the Blackberry curve camera sucks.







OPTION 1, sweet and simple.

I figure I could pound it flush and run with 2 of the 3 bolts. If I were to do this I would do it on both sides also.

OPTION 2, More complex.

I was also thinking I could cut a circular hole where the yellow circle is at. I figured a circle would be better strength wise so I don't have to patch it up. I was thinking I would find a hole saw big enough to get a big washer, nut and a wrench in there and a rubber or plastic plug that would fit the hole. Kinda like the plugs people use on the firewall.

I could stick the wrench in there to get the subframe on, then put some sealant on the plug to keep the water out. If I ever needed to drop the subframe again all i would have to do is pop the plug out and put the wrench back in. It wouldn't be seen in the engine bay from the top and the brake lines you see there will be moved and I will be trimming the fuel lines back under the car some more so all you will see in the AN stuff that will be going on the car.

Good idea or bad idea?
 

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You can gain access to that nut from the interior floor board. A few tap welds and you can remove the sheet metal that's there and re weld the nut in place. That's more complex but it's the neatest way of repairing that kind of damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can gain access to that nut from the interior floor board. A few tap welds and you can remove the sheet metal that's there and re weld the nut in place. That's more complex but it's the neatest way of repairing that kind of damage.
I did not know that. I stared at the area for a while from the engine bay but did not see a logical way to get in there other then the way I described. I didn't think about going from the interior.

My only issue is I don't have any welding equipment, although I am thinking about getting some cheap mig setup to clean up the engine bay. I wonder if JB weld or some type of high strength epoxy would work to hold the nut.
 

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I did not know that. I stared at the area for a while from the engine bay but did not see a logical way to get in there other then the way I described. I didn't think about going from the interior.

My only issue is I don't have any welding equipment, although I am thinking about getting some cheap mig setup to clean up the engine bay. I wonder if JB weld or some type of high strength epoxy would work to hold the nut.
No epoxy will be strong enough to hold that nut in place when it is while the bolt is being torqued.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Adam West;77n6651 said:
No epoxy will be strong enough to hold that nut in place when it is while the bolt is being torqued.
Looks like I'm going to learn to weld.
 

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Eh, it will be a few tack welds. I'll be able to handle it.
tack welds? i'm not a pro welder but tack welding is just the first stage. Tacking it keeps the part you're welding in place, then you fill in between the tacks. if you just tack it you're gonna have problems
 
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