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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the middle of building a K24a2 and g25 550 turbo combination, here's some pics of the manifold.
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I want to keep the engine stock and just fit a turbo and injectors.
I have a few questions;

the first one is about the tuning. Is the ECU that comes with the engine good enough to tune for a turbo application? I've seen there are a few different software programs, which one would be the best if the standard ECU is ok.

the second question is about the oil pump. If i don't plan to rev the engine about the stock rev limit, do i still need to change the oil pump?

what size injectors would you recommend? i'll be happy with about 400bhp

what's the maximum safe boost i can run? I was thinking about 10 psi and that should make the engine last as long as possible?

The engine is in a Ford Escort Mk1.
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Thanks in advance for the replies.
 

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if you keep the revs down to OEM levels, there is no need to change anything internally.
Injectors for 400HP, I’d say get decent injector dynamics ID1050x.
If you intend to run e85, you need at least the 1300 cc/min version.

Regarding ECU, if you get a Hondata or Doctronic upgrade for your ECU type, you can map it well.
They even come with Turbo base maps. Both software are free to download incl. the maps, so you can have a look.

Even a NA K24 would give an old Escort a decent shove. A 400HP/400Nm K24 turbo will turn this car into a serious driver’s challenge.
Both mentioned ECUs offer boost by gear. This might be very helpful.
 

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Yuppp, really looking forward to the performance of this combo. Run whatever ECU your budget allows and that your or your tuner are most comfortable using.

I haven't seen any g series dynod yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
if you get a Hondata or Doctronic upgrade for your ECU type
Is there a preferred one for the turbo people? Do i need to send my ECU away?

If you intend to run e85, you need at least the 1300 cc/min version.
If i'm keeping the engine's internals stock, would E85 be better or 95 octane?
Would i be able to make the same power with a lower boost pressure on E85?
It would be nice to keep the boost pressure as low as possible to make the engine last longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's a few more pics...

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The brake servo and master cylinder have now been changed for a smaller one, with the brake pipes exiting on the left.
There isn't much room and i'm still worried about it damaging the seals in the brake system.
I'll make some heat shields and see how it goes.
 

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Your ECU choice is mainly determined by whom is going to tune the car and local availability. Both handle a turbo build well. Boost by gear, fail safety functions, flex fuel support, traction control inputs, flat shift etc.

If you have a dyno operator your intend to use, ask them if they support Hondata and/or Doctronic. Hondata is around for longer and is very likely to be known across the globe.
From a tuning perspective, they are both near identical as they are based on the same ECU. I tune my own car with a Doctronic ECU, but regularly look into maps and logs with the Hondata KManager. Layout is different, but naming, tables and parameters are mostly identical. Same ECU after all, just differently modified.

Doctronic is a little cheaper as it is a new firmware and requires no daughter board. Only a few hardware modifications such as a plug for the programming table are added.

For both, you need to send in your ECU. But you can buy both online incl. an ECU. It just adds some $100 to $200 to the base price as they need to supply an ECU for you as well and cannot convert yours.

Both Software packages are free to download and are fully functional, so have a look for yourself. Both come with a fair share of maps incl. turbo maps.

e85 will require less boost for the same power.
Best to build it as Flex fuel from the beginning. Just fit a Continental flex fuel sensor (OEM for GM etc.) in the return line from the fuel rail and connect it to the ECU.
Once properly mapped, it adapts to the mix in the tank. the ECU alters the maps and correction tables according to the ethanol content.
 
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