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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi, all -

Been a K20A lurker for a hot minute now, so I figured it was finally time to post up what I've been working on. Properly documented information regarding the swap in to a ZF1 chassis is also seriously lacking, so I figured I'd post my progress and findings! The boys at Teknotik are the primary contributing factor to all of this, and I'm incredibly thankful to have them behind me on this project.

Only just began the swap process about two months ago, but I've been documenting the progress of the car over the past four years over on the CR-Z forum, so if you want a backstory to it all, there's about 100 pages over there that precedes all this;

Rustbucket's Build Thread

Let me first introduce the car itself. It's a 2012 Canadian spec EX CR-Z with nav. It's the second car I've ever owned, and the first that I'd bought brand new. I daily drove the car for four years while slowly, but methodically modifying it, only just having subbed out daily duties for an '09 Fit in May of this year.

Here's what it looked like before I tucked it away for the swap.

C-West CR-Z by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Interior Tests by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Edit March 2018;

Car's back in the road in new guise.









 

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Discussion Starter #2
I'll begin by cross-posting from the CR-Z forum up to this point. I took the car off the road in May of this year when I bought the Fit, and it sat dormant until the end of August when I moved in to my new shop space.

Well, it's finally happened - moved in to my new shop space today! I can finally start tearing the car down for the swap.



Shortly after I removed the engine and hybrid system.

Productive couple days. She's stripped and ready!



Spent a little time at the shop today pressure washing the engine bay and getting everything cleaned up to accept the K once it's here. I managed to find a complete set locally consisting of a K20Z3, transmission, ECU, and engine harness. I'll compile a comprehensive parts list of products used once everything starts rolling. Hopefully it's helpful to all those attempting the swap themselves.

Today's weapon.

Wash Bay Day by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

All cleaned up and rolled back in.

Wash Bay Day by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Incredible easy to manoeuvre with all the weight out of the car! I was worried I'd have to invest in shorter springs if the weight threw off the car at all. Looks like I might be fine, and compression wasn't affected as much as I'd thought.

Wash Bay Day by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #3
End of September, and I'd pinched the pennies to pick up an engine set from a local scrap yard. This turned out to be a bit of a mistake, but hindsight's 20/20, right?

The eagle's finally landed. Picked up a K20Z3, transmission, and ECU yesterday - one of the larger purchases finally out of the way. My mounts should be here next week for initial mock-up. So excited to see this sitting in the bay!

K20Z3 CR-Z by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K20Z3 ECU by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
And, when I finally started tearing in to it.

Threw the engine up on the stand, and began cleaning it up/tearing it down. Wrapping my head around it all, and putting together a small list of items I'll need from K-Tuned to sort out my cooling system. I'll be using a K-Tuned lower thermostat housing with the -16 swivel fitting, along with the matching upper coolant housing with integrated filler neck, again it'll be a -16 fitting to the rad. I've got my mind set on the Rywire tucked rad because of the small space it occupies, and because of how tidy the bay ends up with the rad shoved under the core support. Daniel (Srodaniel) seemed to have good luck with this rad in the California heat, so I'm not sweating it for my application at all. I do believe he began to heat soak when he added the supercharger, but there's definitely no plans for FI in my build, so I think I'll be alright.

Got rid of the Z3's stock 'oil cooler' in favour of the Greddy unit I was using on the LEA previously. It'll be a tight squeeze with the exhaust manifold, but I'm going to cover the lines and sensors in a pyrojacket as the factory heatshield won't accommodate the new unit.

K20Z3 Teardown by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K20Z3 Teardown by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K20Z3 Teardown by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

It'll be slow progress over the next month, as I've got a couple other things taking financial precedent, but I'll going to plug away at this as life permits.
This was when the aftermarket parts began to roll in from the boys at Teknotik.

Got the first haul of K-Tuned parts, as well as my Hasport mounts, as always courtesy of Teknotik.

The current state of affairs.

The Project Pile by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Up first is the Hasport ZF1 K20 engine mounts. These are suitable for both K20 and K24 blocks.

Hasport CR-Z K20 Mounts by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Hasport CR-Z K20 Mounts by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Hasport CR-Z K20 Mounts by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

One of the pieces I was most excited about was the K-Tuned billet shifter. This is the TSX variant, because along with V6 Accord shift cables, they'll play nice with the K20Z3 transmission without modification. Looks really cool, so with a little trimming, it'll remain exposed in my center console.

K-Tuned TSX Shifter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K-Tuned TSX Shifter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K-Tuned TSX Shifter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I got rid of A/C, as the car is no longer my daily, and won't see nearly as much mileage as it did previously. I also really didn't want to notch my frame rail for the A/C compressor, or deal with relocating a condenser and new lines. The K-Tuned A/C and power steering delete kit relocates the alternator to the bottom of the block and provides a belt and tensioner solution for the new routing.

K-Tuned A/C P/S Delete Kite by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I also needed to address the new cooling system. I'd already decided I'd run a Rywire/All-In tucked style radiator with -16 inlet/outlets, so I picked up the K-Tuned Lower T-Stat Housing along with their -16 Upper Coolant Housing with the integrated coolant fill. The nice part about the upper coolant neck is that it makes bleeding the car an absolute breeze as it's now the tallest point in the cooling system.

K-Tuned Swivel T-Stat Housing by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

K-Tuned Upper Coolant Housing by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Last K-Tuned piece that came in was the billet fuel rail. We're kind of lucky having a returnless fuel system capable of supporting a K20/24, because it makes the fuel line issue incredibly painless. It's one -6 line from the EFI connector at the firewall to the -6 port on the fuel rail. The stock FPR and pump will support stock K20 and K24 applications according to Hasport.

K-Tuned Fuel Rail by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

That's about it for an update right now. In the next month or so I need to put in an order with Toronto Honda for some miscellaneous hardware that will allow me to set the engine in the car for the first time and begin sorting things out. I'll be sure to document things as they progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I finally started to catch some wind and get excited about plumbing it, so I started seeking inspiration from some other K-swapped cars I'd seen online.

Productive day today!

I've spent the last week studying different K-series swapped cars, and their different plumbing set-ups. I know from my research that the K20's generally have a lot of crankcase pressure, so I've been incorporating plans for a catch can and trying to figure out what configuration I like best.

One of my biggest inspirations so far has been Phil's DC2;



Phil Sison's Exclusive Content

While I won't be going through the trouble of a completely tucked engine bay, I do thoroughly enjoy a well-plumbed engine. My vision should play out something similar to what you see in the DC2 above (sans ITB's, obviously).

The tool's of choice this evening;

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

First up was getting rid of the driver's side crank case breather. In order to keep everything tidy with short lines, I'm going to have my catch can on the passenger side of the engine bay, close to the headlight.

Drillin' Tappin'-2 by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Propane torch and some channel locks will make quick work of the bonded barbs.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

All gone! Ready for drilling and tapping.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Tapped to 3/8" NPT, ready to accept the Aeroquip aluminum plugs.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

With the plug in place, you can see it's a cleaner option than the NPT to JIC fitting that's capped in Phil's engine bay. I will be welding bungs to the passenger side of the valve cover in a similar fashion to his so that all my lines are consolidated on one side of the bay.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

All of the coolant, oil, and vacuum lines in my engine bay will be fashioned out of Aeroquip's Starlite hoses and black anodized fittings. This required me to pull all of the bonded barbs and nipples out of the intake manifold and block, and then drill and tap all those holes to accept NPT to JIC adapters.

Tapped the throttle body to 1/4" NPT to plug and delete the EVAP purge line.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The brake booster vacuum port drilled and tapped to 1/4" NPT to accept a 45 degree NPT to JIC adapter.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Aaaand, the idle air assist port drilled and tapped to 1/4" NPT to eliminate it completely.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Also tapped for deletion, but not pictured, was the stock PCV. My catch can will vent to atmosphere rather than having my intake manifold pull the vapours, so there was no need for that port anymore.

I yanked the water pump housing off the block while I was at it and removed all the residual crap that the OEM idler pulley used to bolt to. You can see the shiny spot on top of the housing where I cut all the bracketry off. It makes for a substantially cleaner look! I'll be using an M14 to JIC adapter from the PCV port (the open hole in the housing below) to run a line to my catch can.

Drillin' Tappin' by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I know you're probably wondering why I'm going through all this trouble for aesthetics sake while it still looks like my block and transmission were pulled from alongside the Titanic. Unfortunately, whatever solvent or cleaner the scrap yard uses to wash down the parts must be incredibly caustic, because it's left a disgusting residue all over the place. Before winter hits completely I'll be using walnut shells to blast my entire engine and transmission casing. This will bring back the OEM luster without altering the aluminums surface.

I know these updates aren't as fun as the ones with shiny parts, but I'm just doing my best to be thorough with the documentation.
Losing a little sleep over small things at this point, but kept plugging away!

Long day, but I got the block and transmission to a state that I'm happy with. Blasting with walnut shells, and scrubbing with a brass brush didn't bring the block or transmission back to a state I was happy with, so I decided to bite the bullet and paint the pair with high-heat engine enamel. Chose a neutral grey colour, as all the 'aluminum' colour enamel's I've ever seen end up looking cheap and tacky. The engine should look fantastic sat in the bay with the billet mounts and black plumbing.

Transmission after walnut blasting and brass wire wheeling. Took all the corrosion off it, but left it looking inconsistent - this is point that I decided coating the pair was going to be the solution.

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

After two coats of enamel. Night and day difference.

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Same goes for the engine itself.

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Looks great as I started bolting parts back on. I'm in the preliminary stages of reassembly, so only some parts are getting bolted back on for good right now. Pleased with the outcome so far, though.

Block & Tranny Cleaning by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #5
We're now caught up and it brings us to this evening!

Took some updated photos of the engine this evening, in anticipation of setting the engine/tranny in the chassis for the first time tomorrow. Shane at Toronto Honda is bringing in a whole pile of OEM fasteners, and some other miscellaneous stuff I needed to get the engine complete. Pending that stuff, I can test fit the engine.

Removed the front end and cowl to give myself plenty of space to work with.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Here's some photos of the engine plumbing as it progresses.

Had some spare time on my hands, so I set about shaving the RBC manifold, and removing the webbing between the runners. I'll be blasting the raw spots with a harsh media to bring the cast surface finish back to those spots before painting the entire manifold with silver enamel.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Injector Air Assist ports both tapped and plugged.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

EVAP purge port tapped and plugged.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Stock brake booster vacuum tapped and plugged for a cleaner vacuum option seen below.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Brake booster will now receive vacuum from this end of the manifold. I was toying with the 180 fitting, but it looks large and cumbersome, so I'm going to replace the straight NPT adapter with a 90 degree unit, and run a 90 degree fitting from that to send it under the manifold. You can also see the M14 adapter used to convert what was once the PCV to a -6 line that'll run to my catch can.

Ready to Accept by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

More to follow tomorrow if everything goes as planned.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Picked up a plethora of bolts from Toronto Honda this morning. My shift cables, waterpump, and other miscellaneous stuff should arrive next week also.

I mostly just needed the tranny to engine bolts to slam the two together and test fit the engine for the first time.

Nuts n' Bolts by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Got 'er sat in there today, though. Tight squeeze, but the tolerances are good!

K20 CR-Z by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The engine's going to have to come back out for final assembly once everything's ready, but at least now I can start building the supporting systems.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've been kinda stressing about what to do about a non-pressurized coolant reservoir, as well as an oil catch can lately. Thankfully, inspiration came from an image I saw of a Prelude bay that popped up on Instagram. As it turns out, this was Big Mike's bay from SEMA. The suspended swirl pot over his transmission turned out fantastic, and inspired what I hope to eventually have set up.





I turned my attention this evening to making new holes for bungs to be welded on for the crank case breather lines. This meant removing the baffle from the backside of the cover.

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Drilling out the rivets. The space the rivets once occupied will be drilled and tapped to accept M5 button head cap screws to fasten the baffle back in place.

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Which then exposes the breather passages.

Crankcase Breather3 by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Measured and staggered two holes for the bungs.

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

These two holes line up with existing passages in the valve cover. I'm going to weld two tunnels so the system is completely sealed within the baffle. This way I won't have a bunch of oil escaping in to the catch can, just the vapours as originally intended.

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

And, finally, the reason I staggered the holes.

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I can run the lines side by side without interfering with the injectors or wiring, and there'll be no kinks in the lines to keep them parallel. It's allllllll about aesthetically pleasing plumbing!

Crankcase Breather by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Will report back on this one as I finish it up.
 

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Curious to see more on the breather set up. Liking this so far keep it up. Would also like to see more about what you are doing with where the battery pack was at.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Curious to see more on the breather set up. Liking this so far keep it up. Would also like to see more about what you are doing with where the battery pack was at.
Cheers, man.

I actually kept a full interior with my Cusco roll bar, so you won't even be able to tell the batteries are gone from the back. There's a false floor from the factory on top of where the batteries go, so it'll all look just the same as it did before.

CR-Z Interior by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

CR-Z Cusco Cage by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

CR-Z Cusco Cage by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

This is Daniel's car set up the same way, so you can see the stock rear hatch floor;

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Finished up my end of the valve cover modifications. Got the cover tapped to refasten the baffle with some M6 x 10mm stainless hardware.

Tapping Tools by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Whole lot of holes to drill and tap.

Valve Cover Tapped by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Baffle back in place.

Baffle Fastened by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The baffle can now be removed when the aluminum passages are welded in from the breather holes, and I can clean it all out properly before reassembly with the Honda-Bond.
 

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Love these cars!
Yours is the best looking one I have seen yet and kswap makes it even better.
Nice work thus far. Keep up the good work!

01' MR2 K20 swap, crazy mods to come
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Love these cars!
Yours is the best looking one I have seen yet and kswap makes it even better.
Nice work thus far. Keep up the good work!

01' MR2 K20 swap, crazy mods to come
I appreciate the kind words, thank you!

Made a little more progress the other night.

Alternator was looking hella nappy when I picked it up, so I tore it down a bit for some fresh paint.

Alternator by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

After paint, and reassembly with the K-Tuned pulley.

Alternator by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The balance of my Honda order also arrived, so I received my Accord cables. These will allegedly work with a stock shifter (though I'm using K-Tuned's billet TSX/Accord shifter), and both ends are pretty damn similar, so I'm wondering if I could have gotten away with the stock cables after all. Regardless, every source I looked at suggested these cables were required for correct operation, and they weren't worth a whole hell of a lot, so I went ahead with them. It's really just the overall length that appears to be the issue.

Accord top, CR-Z bottom.

Accord Cables vs CR-Z Cables by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Accord Cables vs CR-Z Cables by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Accord Cables vs CR-Z Cables by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The bracket that holds the cables to the chassis in the exhaust tunnel doesn't line up right off the bat, so I'll have to redrill the Accord bracket to work. The CR-Z bracket doesn't work with the Accord cables because the rubber insulator is shaped differently.

I was really hoping based on images I'd found online that the rubber grommet was going to be the same on both cables so that I didn't need to cut it off my old cables to swap, but such is not the case. You can see in the top photos of the cables that the CR-Z grommet is the same shape, but much larger than the Accord one. Not a huge deal, but just something to keep in mind.

Nothing exciting about the waterpump, but the one on my engine was all oxidized and gross, so I picked up a new one for what it's worth.

Waterpump by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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No rust but great shine

Wow, this modified chassis of CR-Z's looks soooooooooo amazing race like...coooollest stuff, man! Where did you get that banner with the German lisence plate picture with the letters of "Volksfest" (Ger. for folk festival or fair)?

I really like that entertaining build thread! I am looking forward to see progress and more of it :).

Markus
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Re: No rust but great shine

Wow, this modified chassis of CR-Z's looks soooooooooo amazing race like...coooollest stuff, man! Where did you get that banner with the German lisence plate picture with the letters of "Volksfest" (Ger. for folk festival or fair)?

I really like that entertaining build thread! I am looking forward to see progress and more of it :).

Markus
Thanks for the kind words, Markus.

I'm just renting this shop space, so the banner has nothing to do with me. I wouldn't be caught dead in any german vehicle besides a Porsche.

Spent a little more time on the cables today. Here's the Accord bracket versus the CR-Z bracket in the exhaust tunnel; not even close to lining up.

Cable Brackets by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I cut some sheathing off the CR-Z's OEM cables to fashion a new sleeve to adapt the Accord cable's overall diamater to the CR-Z bracket. The one on the right has the sheathing added where it sits in the bracket.

Cable Sleeve by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

And, both all snugged up.

CR-Z Bracket Accord Cables by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I also made two slits in the CR-Z cable grommet so I could remove it from the OEM cables and slide them over the new Accord cables.

CR-Z Grommet by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Test fit the cables back in the car after that.

It was only after I began writing this post that I realized I ordered the wrong bloody Accord cables. What I really should have purchased were the 5MT cables, rather than the V6 6MT cables, but I think I can make amends with it all. I've gotta pick up an OEM Civic cable stay and cross my fingers that everything plays nice together, because these cables won't work with the K-Tuned Z3 bracket that I'd planned on using. You live and learn as they say!

Finally fit the alternator up to the car, and I was happy it wasn't bolted to the engine when I was dropping it in the chassis. She don't fit without a notch!

Alternator Clearance by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I took the pulley off, and traced some rough cut lines that I'll make tidy once the engine is back out of the car. That side of the core support has to be notched to allow clearance for the alternator relocate. OEM Honda top bolt used, because of all the horror stories with the aftermarket hardware.

Alternator Notch by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Re: No rust but great shine

Alrighty, then! It's been a minute since my last update, but I've been slowly working through some things, and getting ready for fab work to take place.

Received a large box of fun stuff from the guys at Teknotik today. First up was a batch of stuff from Vibrant that I needed for my exhaust, intake, and some ancillaries to get built next month.

Vibrant Order by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I was on the fence about using one of K-Tuned's 3" turndown mufflers, but after a discussion with Colin at Teknotik I decided I'd rather go with the quieter Vibrant muffler, and have the guy's at GT weld a turndown on to that muffler. I also bought a 3" Ultra Quiet resonator for my mid-pipe to cut down on the noise a little more.

Muffler & Resonator by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Picked up a couple 3" V-bands for the system as well. Unsure at this point whether a third will be required, but I'll cross that bridge when we get there.

3" V-Bands by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

For as long as I can remember I told myself I'd use one of these Vanjen couplers if I ever had an intake built, and now's finally my chance. I love how clean these look.

Vanjen Coupler by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Picked up a basic filter for the intake system as well.

Vibrant Filter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Last up was a couple -8AN bungs for my valve cover breather holes, and a small bung for the bottom of the coolant resevoir that I'll have built.

Bungs by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Got a slew of K-Tuned goodies in the shipment, as well.

Water pump plug for the Z3 pump that has provisions for the OEM oil warmer. I deleted all that garbage for the sake of an external Setrab cooler that I was using previously.

Water Pump Plug by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Last piece of my fuel puzzle was this 1/4" EFI to -6AN adapter. Makes the fuel system incredibly painless.

EFI Adapter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Needed a rad cap to go along with the K-Tuned upper coolant housing and integrated fill neck.

Rad Cap by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Picked up some new bushings for the Accord cables I'll have to buy, since my old Hybrid ones were looking a little nappy.

Shift Bushings by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

The corresponding cable bracket for the Accord 5MT cables that I need to buy. For the life of me, I couldn't figure out why I'd bought the wrong cables initially, or where I thought I'd be able to use V6 6MT cables. Turns out it was that damn Super Street article about swapping a CR-Z! In the article it states Hasport used V6 6MT cables and their own custom bracket. I can safely say that V6 6MT cables DO NOT work with a Z3 trans and Accord/ TSX shifter; you've gotta buy K-Tuned's Z3 adapter for the 5MT cables. Lesson learned the hard way, I suppose.

Z3 Adapter by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Last up was one of K-Tuned's slave cylinders and Intake manifold/ Throttle body gaskets.

Clutch Slave by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

Manifold Gaskets by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Got some other miscellaneous stuff the other day as well.

I've always liked these Circuit Hero coil covers, and they were on sale for $49, so I grabbed one for myself. Should look much better when I've got the valve cover finished up and repainted.

Circuit Hero Coilpack Cover by Oliver Flower, on Flickr

I've also always hated the generic hardware supplied with the Cusco rollbars, so I when I reassembled my interior the other day I bought a bunch of flanged hardware to replace the old stuff. I figured since I've got the car this blown apart, I might as well make it perfect in all aspects going back together. OCD's a bit of a c*nt sometimes.

Cusco Hardware by Oliver Flower, on Flickr
 
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