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As many of you know we have been working on the K series for just about 3 years now. The first motor was built in early 2003 and ran in the Sept issue of Car & Driver Shoot Out. Since then we have been working and building many K series race engines. We have not been able to share everything we have been doing if full because of certain obligations. But now that those obligations are finished we can now concentrate our products and engines to the consumer market. We apologize for only giving small samples of what we are doing with the K series engines. But the wait will be well worth it.

For the past few years we have been supplying road race engine to certain overseas race teams. These are mostly spec motors that have certain limitations. They have to be 2.0 liter, wet sump, low octane fuel and stock throttle body configurations. These particular motors are around 300 flywheel whp and 200 lbs of torque. The development for these types of engines has been very long. We have spent hundreds of hours running many different combinations on the computer as well as the engine dyno.

We are also the supplier to Grand Am racing for the Acura TSX. We have developed a engine package which uses our cams and valve train, oil pan baffle and exhaust header.
And we are currently building three TSX engines for this upcoming season.

Club RSX owner Chris Dye has also teamed up with HyTech to build and develop a reliable engine for his NHRA Street Stock RSX.

A 2.4 liter Honda Challenge road race motor for Hasport
Honda ChaH

We also have consulted and supplied some RSX teams for the SCCAWorld Challenge Series as well.

As of late. Carrillo Industries, Wiseco Piston’s and HyTech are teamed up to do some very technical rod and piston development. Carrillo has a new Gen 4 material that can get the rod weight down to what a Titainium rod would weight, but with twice the strength, around 400 grams. Wiseco has some new skirt designs that can withstand higher side loads for shorter rod ratio’s and their weight is about 200 grams for the piston. These newer combinations will allow us to turn the motors to 10,000 rpm’s very reliably. Mainly because our reciprocating weight will be much lower. These new developments will push the power limits higher. The findings of these developments will be published in one of the Import magazines.

For part of the last 3 years we have been working on some of the weak points of the K series motors. The oiling systems have a few big issues that have been addressed and fixed. Most people have thought that the rod bearings weren’t up to the task. But the bearings are fine, it is the oil pump that is the problem. At 8,500 rpm’s the pump starts to loose efficiency and the volume it needs to deliver starts to drop. The speed of the pump at 8,500 rpm’s is 13,600 rpm’s. That is very fast, in comparison the B series turns the pump at crank speed. And most dry sump pumps turn ½ crank speed. But to run the iVTEC and VTEC the pump needs to be able to supply a lot of oil to make them work correctly at low rpm’s. The same problem with the cam towers, the supply of oil is marginal so we have externally oiled the can tower to eliminate that problem. The only other major issue is the water pump also goes into cavitation at high engine speeds. So to develop durable race engines we had to address these issues and fix them.

So what dose all this mean. It means, that our work over the last three years will go to help building and educating the consumer on what items that need to be fixed and what it takes to build reliable engines. We have compiled a lot of data on cam design, piston shape, cylinder heads, intake manifolds, exhaust headers etc.

Nikos’s has been kind enough to offer HyTech a Forum that we can use to show and educate the reader about the K series engines. Over the next few months we will show a lot of what we have been up to for the last few years. We have hundreds of dyno runs, pic’s and video’s. There is a lot of data that we will supply with our findings.

The dyno figures we use are from the engine dyno. It is flywheel HP and torque. To develop reliable data and repeatable numbers the engine dyno is very good at giving us this info. We fully instrument the engine to collect as much data as we can to help us in our work. The chassis dyno doesn’t allow us to do what we want or need so we do not use them for the development. We will be able to show chassis dyno numbers compared to the engine dyno. As it becomes available later.

Lastly and most importantly, since we deal mostly race teams and professional engine builders with their exhaust development. There has been a reoccurring issue that has confused a lot of people over the years. They call it transient response. What it is, or means, is how fast, can a particular engine accelerate from one rpm to the next. This is not always a direct relationship to torque or horsepower. In road racing the peak power numbers are not what makes a good engine. Broad torque curves are much better for acceleration. The motors are never at peak rpm’s, the motors are constantly going up and down in the rpm range. So giving up peak numbers for more torque, are what works best. In drag racing the transient is a little different. But the same rules apply. Then key is to get the car to be as quick as you can for it given circumstances, which traction is one of them. It’s a fine line that only a lot of testing can figure out. We will be addressing this issue on an ongoing basis on the HyTech Forum.

The two video clips are of a 2 liter road race engine on the dyno and the other is a shot of the dyno screen during the run. The numbers that you see on the clip are uncorrected horsepower figures. Plus the display does not keep up the with motor in real time. So when corrected the peak horse power figure is 306. For those of you who do not understand the corrected and uncorrected figures. These are common standards that are used to correct to SAE standards.


www.k20a.org/K20Movie1.wmv

www.k20a.org/K20Movie2.mpg

Sincerelly,

John Grudynski
HyTech Exhaust Systems
12 Hammond Dr #203
Irvine, CA. 92618
(949) 581-2181
[email protected]
 

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That's what i'm talking about. I'm glad there is another supporter to the k-series development. Well, actually, you were always there but now it's being released to the public. That is great news. I will be waiting.
 

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Im glad you guys are willing to share your info with everyone.Thank you.
 

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realek4 said:
Can you show us some pics of the modified oil pumps you have played around with???
I am in the same boat as you, the oil system is what I am interested in. oil pump and pan.
 

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great news John :up: I would be interested in upgrading my oiling system as well.

I am pretty much all set on swap install - just waiting on you to finish the twinloop axle back for my ek & then we can get my exhaust fitted. as I stated before I have your header ready to ship back just waiting on your word.

I was thinking if you could make the connector piece (that goes around the Karcepts kit) adjustable length (slip-fit) to compensate for the length of the adjustable length header. I can wait to dyno the header (different lengths) to see what setup makes the most power (& see how it affects hp & tq)

-Greg O.
 

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nice to see you guys are going to be releasing and educating the genearl public now...

I to am also interested in what kind of developments you guys have made with teh oil and water pumps, and I would love to see how you guys externally oiled the cam towers...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The Type S oil pump is limited on how much volume it can supply at hi engine speeds. Mainly form 8,500 to 9,500 rpm's. We have two fixes, to modify the type S pump and the other is to retro-fit the S2000 pump into the k motor. For motor's that will not see 9,000 the modified type s pump will be okay. We also developed a oil pan baffle that helpos keeop the oil near the pick up. For engines that will run to 9,500 then the S2000 pump is what we use. The work to make the S2000 pump is quite extensive. We have been working on revisions to make it as simple and cost effectivb.e as it can be.

For the cam towers we simple extrenally oil them. We draw oi from the oil pressure sensor and redirect it to the #5 tower where we drill tap and cut grooves it the tower to get oit to the shafts. You also have to plug the rear of the rocker shafts to stop oil from engaging VTEC.


Cost to modify the type S pump is 90.00, retrofit the s2000 pump is 450.00 which includes the cost of the new pump. The oil pan baffle is 279.00. And the external cam tower upgade costs 199.00 And requires you to send the #5cam tower top and bottom and the two rocker shafts.
 

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For the cam towers we simple extrenally oil them. We draw oi from the oil pressure sensor and redirect it to the #5 tower where we drill tap and cut grooves it the tower to get oit to the shafts. You also have to plug the rear of the rocker shafts to stop oil from engaging VTEC.

????

has it been tested that the cam caps take to much oil from the lower bearings, or they can starve for oil and scar cams at highrpm?




number 5 is the cam cap to the left? (not at the shop)... so why plug the shafts? because the oil on the inside of the shafts are what turn vtec on... isn't it? so why modify anything in the shafts, if something i would be lead to beleive only the cap would have to be modified.... i'm very curious on this i'll have to dig my spare overeved k20a2 head and caps to see what you mean because i'm kinda curious on this.
 

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how about the water pump? what are you guys doing with those?
 

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John,
If done properly the No.5 cam saddle can be machined to provide the cams with constant full volume full pressure oiling without having to plug off the rear of the rocker shafts, this is something I pioneered quite some time ago. I've also built 9,500+ RPM K20A's that don't have any problems using the stock oil pump, and the fix only costs 80 cents.
Hope to see your stuff actually hit the marketplace sometime soon.
Joe
 

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sorry if sounds cheap, but never knew it was an issue on the cam caps.. but I guess I can see what' the problem. I'm very intrigued...

i'll look over the oil galleries in the head and caps tommorow, where the cam holder lines up etc, and judging from your 80cent fix, seems like your drilled an angled passage, hitting the oil gallery towards from the feed to the bearing cap feed, intersecting both, and plugged the end so it woudn't bleed off in the head.

the only thing is wouldn't that take away pressure from the bottom end? hmmmm... "interesting nevertheless"
 
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