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Ok, for the fuel system.

The k series engines uses a fuel system with no return line so for the civic that needs to be modified.

Basically, there are different ways u can set it up


From the stock fuel filter, you will need a banjo bolt+fitting to go in the fuel line that will take you to the Fuel PRessure regulator, then to the fuel rail, out of the fuel rail returning back.

Some people put the pressure gauge on the fuel rail, other on the Fuel PRessure regulator and some add a gauge to get the correct pressure dialed in and then remove it. The aeromotove FPR that I will be using has a place for the gauge so that is where I will be mounting mine.

There are 3-4 fuel rails that can be used not to mention that with the right tools you can even modify the stock k20a fuel rail, but I didn;t want to start a fire so I didn;t. The AEM , STR , units are nice but the Golden Eagle Fuel rail was the best choice for me because it costs around $100 less that the others.

So basically you need a fuel rail, lines, fittings, FPR and a guage

Different fuel rails have different openings. For example the STR rail has -10 AN and the GE one has -8 AN so the only parts that would change in the list below would be the 2 -6 AN to -8 AN Flare Reducers


I got the AEROMOTIVE one from jegs for $130.. summit racing has the same price

1 Aeromotive A1000-6 Injected Bypass Regulator - A1000 -6 Injected Bypass Regulator
Part number is :027-13109 $131.99

My complete fuel set up

Golden Eagle fuel rail from camp1320.com $120 shipped

lines and fittings from http://www.jegs.com

Qty. Item Item Price Subtotal
2 Jeg's ''AN'' Union Adapter & Reducer Fittings - -6 AN to -8 AN Flare Reducer

1 Aeroquip AQP Stainless Steel Braided Hose - AN Size: -06; 6 Foot Length
023-FCA0606 $29.99 $29.99

1 Aeromotive A1000-6 Injected Bypass Regulator - A1000 -6 Injected Bypass Regulator 027-13109 $131.99 $131.99

1 Jeg's ''AN'' Plugs and Caps - -6 AN Flare Plug
555-100302 $2.69 $2.69

1 Jeg's ''AN'' Swivel Hose End Fittings - -6 AN Hose End
555-100001 $4.99 $4.99

4 Jeg's ''AN'' Swivel Hose End Fittings - -6 AN 45� Hose End
555-100011 $13.99 $55.96

1 Jeg's ''AN'' Union Adapter & Reducer Fittings - -6 AN Flare Union
555-100202 $1.99 $1.99

1 Jeg's Fuel Pressure Gauge - 0-100 psi Fuel Pressure Gauge
555-41013 $19.99 $19.99

Subtotal $265.58 <--- $265.58 Summit racing would be the same almost unless you went with rusell fitings that are a little bit more


Then the banjo bolt I got from http://www.summitracing.com

Earl's Performance Plumbing

EAR-807691 Fitting, Hose End, Single Banjo -6 AN to 12mm x 1.25, Swivel Seal, Red/Blue, Ea <---- $19

I received the banjo bolt ands tested it on the stock fuel fillet works, great.

So overall, around $400 for complete suel system





Here's a pic of a nice EK k20a. Notice how his setup has the FPR




HERE' S A EG WITH THE FPR MOUNTED ON THE FUEL RAIL




I hope this is enough info. Of course the fewer fittings u use the less it will cost you. 45 degree fittings are the most expensive and in theory you can avoid most of them but one but I wanted the fuel line to be rooted in a nice way.
 

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Ok, I'm clueless when it comes down to this! :) I understand the -6an stuff but I get confused with which one I need. I'll be using the aeromotive fuel regulator. I have the lines already but which fittings will I need? I think I need two plus a block off plug? If anyone can help me out, Thank you. I also prefere ordering from jegs! Fast shipping! :up:
 

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I've noticed that most people mount the FPR on the chassis (i.e. firewall, or shock tower portion), but some people also mount it directly to the fuel rail.

Have you heard of any cases where the vibrations from the motor can effectively shake loose the FPR from the fuel rail or whether or not the vibrations affect the FPR's performance regulating fuel pressure because its on the motor?

Also, isn't it more efficient to regulate the pressure from the fuel rail side (i.e. having the FPR attached directly on the fuel rail) than having a fuel line extending out of the fuel rail to the FPR's inlet?
 

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blue92da said:
I've noticed that most people mount the FPR on the chassis (i.e. firewall, or shock tower portion), but some people also mount it directly to the fuel rail.

Have you heard of any cases where the vibrations from the motor can effectively shake loose the FPR from the fuel rail or whether or not the vibrations affect the FPR's performance regulating fuel pressure because its on the motor?

Also, isn't it more efficient to regulate the pressure from the fuel rail side (i.e. having the FPR attached directly on the fuel rail) than having a fuel line extending out of the fuel rail to the FPR's inlet?
Up because I would like to know as well :up: :up:

Hey Nikos.... ANy pics of the "old" setup?
 

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blue92da said:
Have you heard of any cases where the vibrations from the motor can effectively shake loose the FPR from the fuel rail or whether or not the vibrations affect the FPR's performance regulating fuel pressure because its on the motor?
Also, isn't it more efficient to regulate the pressure from the fuel rail side (i.e. having the FPR attached directly on the fuel rail) than having a fuel line extending out of the fuel rail to the FPR's inlet?
It shouldnt come loose if attached correctly, vibrations from the engine/chassis are not going to affect the fuel pressure as much as the injectors are. This can be overcome if the FPR is after the Rail in the fuel system, and a return line is ran back to the tank. Tank-Filter-Rail-FPR-return to tank. This ensures all injectors recieve the same fuel pressure. The length of the lines dosen't matter once the system is pressurized.
 

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Right! I was asking if the FPR could possibly come loose because of the engine vibrations itself and not because of the fuel pressure. I've seen a few guys run the fpr directly onto the rail, but the majority of the people run a fuel line to the fpr inlet and mount it elsewhere. I personally like the idea of the fpr being bolted directly onto the rail, but I would feel more comfortable w/ the fpr anchored down somewhere on the head where it could accidentally spin itself off the rail. Personally I'd rather the fuel be regulated directly from the rail portion of itself to save for the excess being diverted to an extended fuel line which hooks up to the rail and fpr.

signalpuke said:
It shouldnt come loose if attached correctly, vibrations from the engine/chassis are not going to affect the fuel pressure as much as the injectors are. This can be overcome if the FPR is after the Rail in the fuel system, and a return line is ran back to the tank. Tank-Filter-Rail-FPR-return to tank. This ensures all injectors recieve the same fuel pressure. The length of the lines dosen't matter once the system is pressurized.
 

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Yeah cause I'm really looking towards going with that setup. BTW, are there any long-term side effects of mounting the FPR on the engine side of the car as opposed to the chassis? I mean can the vibrations affect the way that the FPR operates, especially since Hasport mounts are so damn stiff? Its probably nothing, but I'd like to know if anyone has had any issues yet?
 

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blue92da said:
I mean can the vibrations affect the way that the FPR operates, especially since Hasport mounts are so damn stiff? Its probably nothing, but I'd like to know if anyone has had any issues yet?
No, the only way it would affect the FPR is if the adjustable nuts came loose and turned themselve out, won't happen if they are tightened correctly.
The virbrations of the engine/chassis will not affect the fuel at all. The only way the fuel will be affected is if the FPR is before the Rail. In this scenario the fuel pressure is set prior to the injectors opening, when they open they effectivly reduce the static pressure in the rail. This can cause a variation in the amount of fuel each cylinder recieves (amount is dictated by jet size, time the injector is open, and pressure of fuel)
 
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