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It most certainly does. Combustion stability will be the result of alot of factors. That being mixture hemogeny, the presence of stress risers in the chamber, oil content in the chamber, cam design and much more.

Thinking in terms of a static compression ratio is one thing as a basis, but understanding what goes down dynamically is another. Larry (owner of Endyn), has successfully run motors at 13:1 on pump gas in Texas heat. This was solely the design of the piston and the chamber, as well as the tuning of course. His rollerwave piston design successfully manipulates the mixture in the chamber by isolating it towards the exhaust valves. It exhibits very stable mixture hemogeny, and as a result detonation resistance.

In that scenario the quench pads must be worked to be just over .040 from the piston in order to be entirely effective. That is where working both sides of the chamber come into play. Be sure to debur everything as well. Reduce pockets and hiding areas for hydrocarbons also.
 

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Well, you can go to many levels of combustion chamber work....how much money do you have?

A basic chamber workover would include a basic debur, some smoothing around the valve entry/outlets, possibly a little unshrouding. An upgrade to high compression valves would be advisable to remove the pockets that the stockies have.

A higher level of chamber work would be further unshrouding of the valves, rounding the entry to the exhaust valves, while gaining some angularity on the intake valve exit (all aiding in overlap and anti-reversion). You would further have all the quench pads CNC'd to specific depth (in the case of recessed pad heads), or for heads with closed chambers you could actually weld up the chamber further and go for the cloverleaf approach. This would yeild compression gain and increase combustion efficiency. You could also look to chamber thermal barrier coatings which also aid in increasing combustion efficiency.

Basically though, this isn't something to be answered in a forum. You need to go off and do some serious research. Just jumping in with a compression number is your first mistake. You need to start with your goals, then put together a package that fits your needs. "X" amount of compression isn't the appropriate starting point.
 
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