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Ah... good info... However that still leaves the question of at what point does this happen and is a smaller crank pulley a better option to help underdrive the water pump.

Not trying to hate or be difficult, just want to make sure that there is actually a problem which needs solving here.

It's a matter of changing of state - from liquid (coolant), to gas (not air). Impeller speed has an impact on the point at which liquid will change state.
 

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Ah... good info... However that still leaves the question of at what point does this happen and is a smaller crank pulley a better option to help underdrive the water pump.

Not trying to hate or be difficult, just want to make sure that there is actually a problem which needs solving here.
This was a very large problem for me on my 10000rpm SFWD B-series. It's directly related to impeller rpm vs target efficiency rpm for the impeller.

On a stock motor, it may not be as much of an issue, but can still cause problems with air pockets, and pressure variations from extended high rpm use. Such as road racing. This can lead to cap overflow and a reduction of capacity in the system.

However, under-driving the water pump may do more harm then good because the basic goal of all cooling systems is for there to be as much coolant velocity past the median as possible. Reference(And a very very good article)

But since your real goal is to solve the issue of state change, perhaps the best solution would be to change the impeller design to target a higher rpm. However, there will still be gas transitions, so a system like this cant hurt.

Groovy? :dance:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Not trying to hate or be difficult, just want to make sure that there is actually a problem which needs solving here.
there really isn't much of a problem - I am just over complicating my cooling system :p in hopes it might operate .001% better (edit = more efficiently) than before

in all honesty I just think there may be some cavitation at high rpm's (ie 8500+)

anyways I have ordered a 3/8" NPT -> -4an fitting for near the upper water neck on the block. & a m18-> -6an fitting for the hasport adapter (for the return line)... with the hasport adapter being located on the lower radiator hose

here is a generic pic of the reservoir which as two -4an (inlet) fittings on the side & one -6an (outlet) fitting on the bottom
 

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I am going to be hooking up a Carbing Radiator Reservoir & have a few questions.

here is diagram of how it should be hooked up


my question is there some fitting outlet that is on the motor that can be used for the line that runs from the motor to the reservoir (see the "coolant with cavitation" bubble)

I was thinking of using a hasport adapter on the lower hose... does anyone know what size fitting that takes? I am guessing 3/4 npt maybe?
And to actually help answer your question :p sorry.

You will want to get your coolant source from the hot side outlet. Somewhere like the heater hose feed, IACV line, or use an adapter in the upper radiator hose. Just make sure it's coming out of the #4 cylinder side of the head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
And to actually help answer your question :p sorry.

You will want to get your coolant source from the hot side outlet. Somewhere like the heater hose feed, IACV line, or use an adapter in the upper radiator hose. Just make sure it's coming out of the #4 cylinder side of the head.
Midas - just to clarify

like I stated in my previous post... I am planning on running a 3/8" npt -> -4an fitting here & running hose from that to the reservoir inlet. sound good?

 

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Sh!t, my fault I should have read your last post. Yes, thats actually perfect. its one of the highest points available on the hot side coolant outlets. It should work beautifully.

I'm sorry, i've been working on a difficult project at work and my minds kinda moving slow... lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
cool - now the only trick will to be to mount the reservoir inlets higher than my fitting there... shouldn't be to hard :rolleyes: (I got 20ft of -4an hose :silly:)

thanks for your (& everybody elses) input :up: been a big help :cool:
 

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I have a similar Greddy can here that a customer purchased and I was a little confused at why it seemed to be over complicated and how you were supposed to come up with the extra, yet all small diameter, coolant lines to go to it. It wouldnt be that difficult really but why lol.

We did ours a fairly simple way on this car but should be just as effective pretty much.

On the spout off the head we welded on our "swirl pot"/fill point higher than the outlet, we capped off the normal fill on the radiator aswell as cut it down the width a little more, ran the line from the pot outlet(lower than the inlet) to the radiator(front mounted but not for the sake of bleeding the system), the line from what was originally the bottom of the radiator is going to our electric water pump, and then from the pump up into the K-Tuned plate and engine. The only thing left is to mount a overflow reservoir and run a line to the "Swirl Pot". We will mount the overflow lower than the fill aswell.

Here are just a few pics.







Keep in mind im no engineer but system makes since to me as far as being efficient and usefull. I still wonder if air will be cought in the upper side of the radiator the way it is but we'll see.

The fittings coming off the swirl pot should also be at somewhat of a tangent angle to the cylinder and both to flow in the same direction to create a flow of a literal swirling motion. This is one of the big parts in bleeding the air aswell. On the Greddy one the fittings actually protrude inside of the cylinder an inch or so to help that motion which I though was a good idea I wish we had also done
 

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Nice info...
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
back from the dead - here's a few more pics

-6an return going to the lower hose. I used a K-tuned swivel neck T-stat housing (instead of an inline hose adapter)


I ran a -4an line from the highest point in the upper coolant passage (where most put the b-series water temp sensor)


the other -4an runs to the top of the radiator (over flow spout)
 

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I have a similar Greddy can here that a customer purchased and I was a little confused at why it seemed to be over complicated and how you were supposed to come up with the extra, yet all small diameter, coolant lines to go to it. It wouldnt be that difficult really but why lol.

We did ours a fairly simple way on this car but should be just as effective pretty much.

On the spout off the head we welded on our "swirl pot"/fill point higher than the outlet, we capped off the normal fill on the radiator aswell as cut it down the width a little more, ran the line from the pot outlet(lower than the inlet) to the radiator(front mounted but not for the sake of bleeding the system), the line from what was originally the bottom of the radiator is going to our electric water pump, and then from the pump up into the K-Tuned plate and engine. The only thing left is to mount a overflow reservoir and run a line to the "Swirl Pot". We will mount the overflow lower than the fill aswell.

Here are just a few pics.







Keep in mind im no engineer but system makes since to me as far as being efficient and usefull. I still wonder if air will be cought in the upper side of the radiator the way it is but we'll see.

The fittings coming off the swirl pot should also be at somewhat of a tangent angle to the cylinder and both to flow in the same direction to create a flow of a literal swirling motion. This is one of the big parts in bleeding the air aswell. On the Greddy one the fittings actually protrude inside of the cylinder an inch or so to help that motion which I though was a good idea I wish we had also done
Bringing a topic from the dead big time here but I've been doing some researching and haven't came up with an answer.

Would a coolant surge tank (i.e. swirl pot) be needed for an electric water pump since the reason for the tank is to bleed pressure spikes due to sudden rpm increases making the impeller rpm higher? With the electric Meizure pump, the water speed/pressure should stay the same no matter what rpm.

Am I over thinking the setup here?
 
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