Honda / Acura K20a K24a Engine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,000 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be hooking up a Carbing Radiator Reservoir & have a few questions.

here is diagram of how it should be hooked up


my question is there some fitting outlet that is on the motor that can be used for the line that runs from the motor to the reservoir (see the "coolant with cavitation" bubble)

I was thinking of using a hasport adapter on the lower hose... does anyone know what size fitting that takes? I am guessing 3/4 npt maybe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
The threads on the Hasport hose adapter are the same as the threads on the fan switch - M18 x 1.5.

There's also the k-tuned thermostat housing.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,000 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the thread size & pitch :up: just ordered an earl's metric to -6an adapter

could I run the line, from to where everybody runs the temp sender (for swaps), to the reservoir?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
I don't see why you couldn't.

I don't have any practical experience with coolant expansion tanks/systems as a whole. However, in theory, it looks as though you would want the port on the engine that you're using to route line from, and then into to the expansion tank, to be as high up in the coolant jacket of the cylinder head as possible. Then, again, in theory, you would want to be sure to place the expansion tank on a higher elevation than that outlet port on the cylinder head - allowing air generated via water pump cavitation to have an easy path out of the coolant loop.

I don't believe the water jacket in the cylinder head goes much higher than the port where most people place their water temperature senders.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,000 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its supposed to help draw any air (especially created by cavaitation of the pump @ high rpms) out of the coolant system.

not sure if I can mount the carbing reservoir high enough in the engine bay - so it sits above all the other lines tho :eek:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,257 Posts
Should cavitation be an issue if you are using the correct sized crank pulley? I thought that was one of the reasons that the ITR crank pulley was smaller... To reduce potentially overdriving accessories (water pump) at high rpms.

I don't know man. I think you might be trying to fix a non-problem and seriously complicating your plumbing.

Do you know that you are experiencing cavitation or at what point it beings to occur?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,171 Posts
it will also allow you to fill the system and drain the air from somewhere other than your radiator... Placing it at the highest point in the system it will draw all the air in to the tank and you could have a radiator with no cap. This is what I plan on doing just for packaging issues with my setup and not having room for a rad behind the rad support, I am going to put it in front like an intercooler and have a resivour to fill from...

The only thing I see it doing is making it easier to mount a radiator... Pacman did something similar on his old CRX.

Where did you get the tank, and how much was it? Any pics?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
477 Posts
This is a very common setup from the factory on many vehicles. WRX's have them in stock form and it helps tremendously. It is really helpful on dedicated race setups where electric water pumps are a non option. Here is a good example from a well known drag car.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,171 Posts
ok. so then here is the question. why does the system need to be constantly bled? Where is the air being introduced from?

I don't know that it is being constantly introduced...

On a race setup when motors are coming in and out it would make bleeding the system much easier. It also would take away the need to prop up the front of the car to get teh radiator cap above the rest of the system...

For me having the reserviour at a high and accesible spot makes it worth it. tuck the radiator away and don't worry about it.

Here is Pacmans setup on the old CRX
http://www.k20a.org/forum/showthread.php?t=869&highlight=surge+tank+pacman

Here are some pics from his setup and some more info from the thread.
I really like the solid coolant pipes...









and here's an explanation from the C&R Radiators site:

C&R Racing said:
SURGE TANKS

Also known as expansion tanks, fill cans and header tanks

Using a surge tank as part of your racecar cooling system is a very good decision. Any proper racecar cooling system will incorporate a surge tank. When used properly, it is the ideal manner of filling your system, trapping air, and moving the radiator cap from vulnerable areas where pressure surges can unseat the cap momentarily.

On the return side of a cooling system, pressure can surge as high as 45-50 psi. This is due to sudden changes in pump speed (RPM related) and characteristics of the heat cycle as well as circulation in the system. When the radiator cap is on the radiator, particularly the return side, it is susceptible to this condition. A surge tank isolates the cap from these areas.

Surge tanks should be mounted as high as possible, at the highest point in the cooling system, to serve as an air trap and means for expansion. Plumb a –10 line to the water pump and a –6 line from the highest point of the radiator to the surge tank. This draws air to the tank where it is trapped. Approximately 1/3 to 1/2 of the tank should be air space to create an air “spring” allowing for temperature expansion. Purging all air from the system is the ultimate goal. To optimize the cooling system and insure that all air is purged, use a swirl pot in the return water line in combination with the surge tank.

Due to the unique nature of swirl pots, C & R recommends that each specific application and system be evaluated to determine optimum performance. Therefore, C & R Racing does not offer a “generic” swirl pot, but will tailor a custom swirl pot to your system.

C & R Racing specializes in customized racing cooling systems, and can insure maximum protection for your engine investment and performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
ok. so then here is the question. why does the system need to be constantly bled? Where is the air being introduced from?
It's a matter of changing of state - from liquid (coolant), to gas (not air). Impeller speed has an impact on the point at which liquid will change state.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,171 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
477 Posts
The can would have to be fitted for/allready have a radiator cap fitting to keep the system pressurized while giving you a point to fill the fluid from. Also the AN fittings would have to be low on the can vs high to allow for the resivoir fill volume.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top